Author Archives | Doug Inglis: divingarchaeology.com

Sinking in the earth’s (muddy) magnetic field…

I am wearing $28,000 of sensitive electrical equipment and sinking deeper into the rice paddy with every step. By this point, its pretty apparent that I am going to need some help. I am carrying a device called a gradiometer. It measures anomalies in the earths magnetic field. Our team is using it to look […]

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Real shipwreck treasure – inspiration and education

In the fall of 1619, a hurricane dashed the English Galleon Warwick against the cliffs of Bermuda’s Castle Harbor. After lying beneath the sand for nearly four centuries, the ship has been uncovered again. Some people believe the most valuable thing that we can get from a shipwreck is information about the past. Others think […]

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There are no sidewalks where the sidewalks are

Quảng Yên, Việt Nam There are no sidewalks where the sidewalks are. We cannot walk ten meters without having to weave into the road. Like urban breakers, the streets of Quảng Yên crash into an endless line of little store fonts. The space between curb and building is just another parking spot for trucks, bikes […]

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Vietnam: the Plan

Evidence of one of history’s legendary naval conflicts lies somewhere beneath the inundated rice paddies of rural Vietnam. In November, Veronica and I had a chance to join an international team searching for the remains of the Bạch Đằng River battle, where seven hundred years ago Đại Việt hero Trần Hưng Đạo defeated the forces […]

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How to dig up the bottom of a river – the endless mechanical circus.

I love digging underwater, but loathe of the endless mechanical circus. Don’t get me wrong – being able to vacuum up sediment with a giant hose is far better than having to lug bucket  after bucket of backdirt up and out of your unit. And as far as archaeology is concerned, nothing can beat floating […]

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Air Supply

Depending on technology to breathe is sketchy, particularly when that technology is not all that dependable. While diving in the Aucilla River, our crew relied on surface supplied air, run off a Brownie Third Lung hookah. We dug it out of the dive locker at the Florida Bureau of Archaeological Research where it had been […]

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The Obsidian Aucilla

Stained black by the surrounding swamps, the Aucilla River is an obsidian mirror; it reflects the overhanging forest while hiding a labyrinth of rocks, snags. In places it disappears, running underground – in others, it conceals deep sinkholes formed by collapsed limestone caverns. For decades, river divers have descended into these dark pits in search […]

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The History of the Goodship Warwick

In November 1619, a hurricane ripped across the island of Bermuda. In the King’s Anchorage, the English Galleon Warwick broke free of her moorings and was shattered on the reefs. Warwick was a key link in the lifeline that tied the fledgling colony of Jamestown to Bermuda and England. When she sank, that tie was severed. With no other […]

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Warwick 2011 Team

For the past two seasons, volunteers and archaeologists have been excavating and documenting a 17th century shipwreck, the Warwick, in Bermuda. The Warwick project is a National Museum of Bermuda (NMB) project in partnership with Texas A&M & Institute of Nautical Archaeology  and in association with The Global Exploration and Oceanographic Society (G-EOS) and Department of Archaeology, University of Southampton. […]

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We are updating the site!

Archaeologist Veronica Morriss will be joining Diving|Archaeology as a writer and photographer! We will be posting updates on our recent archaeological explorations in Vietnam. We had an incredible time and have thousands of pictures. In addition to photos from Vietnam, I will be moving though my backlog of Bermuda and Florida picks; Veronica has a […]

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