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The Weapons of Warwick

In 1619, when Sir Robert Rich ordered his Galleon Warwick to sail to the American Colonies with a load of much needed supplies, he may have had more than merchant work in mind. Sir Robert, the Earl of Warwick, was a major shareholder in the Bermuda Company. Although his stake in the joint-stock company was […]

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Sinking in the earth’s (muddy) magnetic field…

I am wearing $28,000 of sensitive electrical equipment and sinking deeper into the rice paddy with every step. By this point, its pretty apparent that I am going to need some help. I am carrying a device called a gradiometer. It measures anomalies in the earths magnetic field. Our team is using it to look […]

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Where Djinn are Watching

The Polish magnetometer team arrived at the dig house just short of 9am.  Their leader, Tomasz Herbich, who is fiercely Polish with a grey mane and arching eyebrows, was accompanied by two younger fellows who were going to do the brunt work.  Rafaat, my second-hand man, was available to chauffeur us around the site.  He’s […]

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Real shipwreck treasure – inspiration and education

In the fall of 1619, a hurricane dashed the English Galleon Warwick against the cliffs of Bermuda’s Castle Harbor. After lying beneath the sand for nearly four centuries, the ship has been uncovered again. Some people believe the most valuable thing that we can get from a shipwreck is information about the past. Others think […]

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The Ancient City of Thmuis (Tell el-Timai)

At the dawn of civilization in the Nile Valley, people settled upon four levees of the Mendesian branch of the Nile.  These sandy embankments protruded from the landscape in a southwest to northeast direction and provided the earliest settlers a safe abode from the annual floodwaters.  Here the first settlement of Mendes, initially known as […]

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Vietnam: the Plan

Evidence of one of history’s legendary naval conflicts lies somewhere beneath the inundated rice paddies of rural Vietnam. In November, Veronica and I had a chance to join an international team searching for the remains of the Bạch Đằng River battle, where seven hundred years ago Đại Việt hero Trần Hưng Đạo defeated the forces […]

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How to dig up the bottom of a river – the endless mechanical circus.

I love digging underwater, but loathe of the endless mechanical circus. Don’t get me wrong – being able to vacuum up sediment with a giant hose is far better than having to lug bucket  after bucket of backdirt up and out of your unit. And as far as archaeology is concerned, nothing can beat floating […]

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A Second Class Ticket to Timai, Egypt

May 25th 2010: I had been in Cairo for nearly three weeks now, staying with my Egyptian-American friend, Rana.  This was a much needed break from the hustle of grad school.  I felt my energy recharged and I was excited for the upcoming season at Tell el-Timai.  The archaeological Tell (mound) is located in the […]

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